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Dorothy B. "Dot" Rhone
Broker/Owner
Century 21 Covered Bridges Realty, Inc.

ABR, CRS, CRB, GRI, e-PRO, SRS, SFR, One America
Office:  570-784-2821 x 19
Cell and Text: 570-204-0279
Email: Dot@DotRhone.com
Licensed in PA # RM421649

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Welcome

Welcome to the premier resource for all real estate information and services in the area!  I am Dorothy B. "Dot" Rhone, Broker/Owner of Century 21 Covered Bridges Realty, Inc. in Bloomsburg, PA.  I hope you enjoy your visit and explore everything my website has to offer!  Here you will find everything you need to know when buying or selling a property in Columbia, Montour, or lower Luzerne county in Pennsylvania in one place!  To get familiar with our local real estate values, here you can view all the current homes on the market in our multiple listing service, as well as see properties that have recently sold. 

Looking for a new home? Use Quick Search or Map Search to browse an up-to-date database list of all available properties in the area, or use my Dream Home Finder form and I'll conduct a personalized search for you.

If you're planning to sell your home in the next few months, nothing is more important than knowing a fair asking price. I would love to help you with a FREE Market Analysis. I will use comparable sold listings to help you determine the accurate market value of your home.  

Whether the circumstance is marriage, a new job, a growing family or retirement, most people move as a result of a major life change.  This is a potentially stressful and exhilarating time for a buyer or seller.  Buyers and sellers need a trusted friend in the real estate process, “Because Life Changes.”  I am responsible for guiding them through the details of the technical and, at times, emotional side of their real estate transaction, give them all the facts, then let them make the decision that works best for their lifestyle.  Ultimately, they ask me to help them manage this major change for them—to be their “Agent of Change.”   With 30 years experience, I am ready to help!  Contact Dot Rhone today!

 

Testimonials Page

My wife and I were real estate novices before buying our first home. After 20 minutes with Dot we knew everything we needed to know! She was professional, helpful, patient, and an excellent advocate when the seller was not acting in our interest. At every stop along the way to homeownership Dot thoroughly explained our options, and every referral she offered us, from mortgage broker to inspection company, was as professional and thorough as she was. We are truly grateful that we had Dot on our team! Mike and Eleanor Vogt
While Dot was handling my home purchase here in Columbia County my mom was selling her home in Snyder County with another agent from a different realty company. I was in the unique position to compare my experience with Dot to that of my mom's with another agent. My mom's experience was a nightmare for her. I came very quickly to appreciate Dot's consummate professionalism, strong sense of values and ethical conduct, knowledge and expertise, and genuine care for me as a client. I will never live to see the day when I can thank Dot enough for helping me sail through the purchase of my first home with ease and peace of mind. She is the best, in my opinion! Matthew Swinehart
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Real Estate News!!!

Latest Realty News from NAR

4 Tips for Organizing Your Home Maintenance Routine

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now on blog.rismedia.com:

Buying a house is only the first step in homeownership. Once you own the property, it will become your responsibility to keep it in good order through regular repairs and maintenance. It can be easy, however, to find yourself falling behind on the job and missing out on important things. Below is a list of suggestions for staying on top of home maintenance tasks.

Learn What Needs Maintaining
The first step to keeping your house in good repair is to learn what kinds of things need doing. Find a good online list of home maintenance tasks, and figure out which ones apply to your particular home. From there, you can start to get an idea of the costs and materials associated with keeping things up. Moreover, you can figure out how much of the maintenance you are capable of performing yourself and which tasks will require an outside contractor.

Make a Calendar
Once you have a solid list of maintenance tasks for your new home, you’ll need to arrange the items in a way that will help you track how often you will need to perform each task. Put it up in a common area, and make sure to mark all of the dates for maintenance clearly. Keep up on advancing the calendar, and note any tasks you need to do every month. It’s probably best to schedule these tasks towards the middle of the month. That way, when the month rolls over, you have a couple of weeks to get the necessary materials.

Use Your Electronics
Of course, modern electronics offer multiple ways to help you organize your life. You can use calendar and reminder apps for your smart devices to replace or supplement your physical calendar if you want. Having a monthly reminder pop up telling you what kind of cleaning and maintenance duties are due at your home is helpful as far as reminding you, though it can be a bit too easy to simply flick the remainder away when it goes off. Either use a redundant system to make sure you actually do the jobs or make sure to set the reminders to go off when you can do them right away.

Put Money Aside
Maintenance isn’t free, unfortunately, and one common cause of putting off what needs to be done is a lack of money when it needs doing. It’s all too easy to tell yourself you’ll just wait a week for some cash to free itself up. To prevent this, set aside a fund for home repair and maintenance tasks, and avoid using it for anything other than a true emergency. For added benefit, find an investment account that will allow you to make money on the fund while waiting to use it.

Home maintenance is not always fun, but it prevents bigger problems down the line. Spending some time now on keeping things up will pay off in the future.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post 4 Tips for Organizing Your Home Maintenance Routine appeared first on RISMedia.

Answer Man: Does Changing the Direction of a Ceiling Fan Really Save You Money?

(TNS)—Q: They say you’re supposed to reverse the direction of ceiling fans in the winter to improve the circulation of warm air, thus helping your furnace’s heating efficiency while reducing your utility bill. Most homes have their warm air ducts at floor level. My house is a little funny in that a previous owner who installed the HVAC system had the ducts placed near the ceiling. Do the same rules still apply?

A: Anyone who listens to KMOX knows master builder remodeler Scott Mosby doesn’t blow a lot of hot air, so you can take him at his word when he says the technique works—perhaps even more so in your case.

As you know, warm air rises, so the idea in winter is to keep that heated air closer to the floor where people sit to read or watch TV. That’s why, Mosby says, it makes sense to make sure your fan is turning clockwise as seen from the floor looking up at the underside of the fan. By doing this, it will push the warm air off the ceiling, down the walls and into that critical living space.

In your case, it seems to make even more sense because most of the warm air is already at the ceiling and won’t come down without help. If you have particularly high ceilings, you might try upping the fan speed a notch. It might seem logical to use the summer setting to force the warm air down, but you’d probably wind up uncomfortable sitting in the constant downdraft. You’ll probably find the less direct method easier to take. Of course, you can always conduct your own experiment to verify the theory as far as comfort and power bills.

Regardless, ceiling fans should be set to run counterclockwise in the summer. Although this technically does not cool the air one iota, it can make you feel more comfortable by producing a mini wind chill effect, allowing you to perhaps turn your thermostat up a degree or two and save energy costs a bit.

Just remember that running the fans when nobody is in the room is a waste of money, since it is doing nothing to lower the temperature. In fact, the heat generated by the fan motor could raise it a tad.

©2017 Belleville News-Democrat (Belleville, Ill.)
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Answer Man: Does Changing the Direction of a Ceiling Fan Really Save You Money? appeared first on RISMedia.

Buy or Rent? How to Decide which Living Option Is Best for You

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

Should you buy or rent? Most people ask themselves this question at one point or another, and there’s no clear correct answer. Before you give up in frustration, take some time to ask yourself the following questions.

How Stable Is Your Lifestyle?
Are you the kind of person who likes to stay in one place, or do you like to move around? If your life is relatively stable and you are looking to put down roots, buying a home is probably a good idea. If you are looking to move around or you are willing to pick up stakes for your job, you should consider renting.

What Are Your Plans for the Near Future?
Your plans for the near future are also very important for deciding whether you will rent or buy. If you are planning on expanding your family, for example, it might be a good idea to buy a home that’s bigger than most apartments. Likewise, if you are planning to move soon, you’ll want to rent. Issues like adopting a pet, taking long trips or even major medical decisions can influence whether purchasing a home is the right move in your life.

What’s Important to You?
You should also take a few moments to consider what’s important for you in terms of a living situation. Do you like privacy, stability, and the feeling of owning your own home? If so, then you’ll want to buy. Do you prefer amenities, a community, and putting the responsibility for home care and maintenance in the hands of professionals? That might mean you want to rent. There’s not a right or wrong answer here, so take some time to come to your own conclusion.

Who Is Helping You?
Finally, think about who’s helping you to make this choice. If you work with professionals, you’ll have a better chance to see more properties and make a more informed decision. One of the worst moves you can make when making this decision is to rush forward without enough information. Always make sure you let a real estate professional help you in your search.

Deciding whether to rent or buy is always a deeply personal decision. Take some time and think things over, then work with a professional to help you find a living situation that suits your lifestyle.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Buy or Rent? How to Decide which Living Option Is Best for You appeared first on RISMedia.

Seven Ways to Save for Your Bucket List Travel

(TNS)—Whether your bucket list consists of big travel goals such as taking a cruise around the world or simpler wishes such as a weeklong road trip, travel costs money. The surest way to make your travel dreams come true is to set money aside designated for those bucket list adventures. Here are a few ideas to get you started.

Save the Change
You might be surprised at how quickly your change adds up when you implement this old school way of saving money. Try using an actual bucket to remind yourself why you are tossing in pennies and nickels every evening.

Step Up to Saving Bills
Amplify your change bucket with stacks of bills. Clear a spot on your nightstand or desk drawer the size of a dollar bill, then start stacking. (Odd Tip: The boxes for iPhones 6 and up are just about the right size for stacking dollar bills, so now you finally know what to do with that sturdy white box you’ve been hanging onto.) When your stack reaches the top of the box or the drawer, take it to the bank.

Open a Separate Bank Account
When your bucket change and bills start stacking up, open a bank account dedicated to travel. A simple savings account that you can transfer money into from your checking account works best and usually won’t incur fees.

Consider a PayPal Account
Why not use something as simple as PayPal as your travel fund? You can transfer money into it from your checking account any time, then let it become your out-of-sight, out-of-mind bucket list fund. Bump up the balance by selling stuff you don’t need on eBay. The money goes right where you want to save it, not in your wallet. When travel time gets closer, get a PayPal debit card to use for the trip.

Buy Travel Gift Cards for Yourself
If money really tends to slip through your fingers, try buying yourself gift cards from the airline you plan to use for your bucket list travel. You will be amazed at how quickly a stack of $25 gift cards can add up to the cost of a flight. Watch for seasonal bonuses from the airline that can make your stack of cards grow even faster. Be sure to keep your cards in a secure spot—one you will remember.

Use a Travel Rewards Credit Card
While it’s okay to study up on all the card offers out there, keep in mind that the card that will get you to your bucket list soonest is the one with rewards you actually want to use. Don’t apply for cards from airlines you rarely fly on, or from a cruise line that is not actually on your bucket list. Pick a card that closely aligns with your travel goals, then use that card for day-to-day purchases instead of reaching for your debit card. Try paying your bill weekly to keep from running up the balance or topping it with interest charges.

Set Up a Stash
Start an investment account with as little as $5 with Stash, an app on your smartphone. Stash lets you set up an investment account with your goals and risk level in mind. Link it to your bank account, set up automatic weekly investments, then let Stash do the work for you.

©2017 Travelpulse

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Seven Ways to Save for Your Bucket List Travel appeared first on RISMedia.

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