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Dorothy B. "Dot" Rhone
Broker/Owner
Century 21 Covered Bridges Realty, Inc.

ABR, CRS, CRB, GRI, e-PRO, SRS, SFR, One America
Office:  570-784-2821 x 19
Cell and Text: 570-204-0279
Email: Dot@DotRhone.com
Licensed in PA # RM421649

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Welcome

Welcome to the premier resource for all real estate information and services in the area!  I am Dorothy B. "Dot" Rhone, Broker/Owner of Century 21 Covered Bridges Realty, Inc. in Bloomsburg, PA.  I hope you enjoy your visit and explore everything my website has to offer!  Here you will find everything you need to know when buying or selling a property in Columbia, Montour, or lower Luzerne county in Pennsylvania in one place!  To get familiar with our local real estate values, here you can view all the current homes on the market in our multiple listing service, as well as see properties that have recently sold. 

Looking for a new home? Use Quick Search or Map Search to browse an up-to-date database list of all available properties in the area, or use my Dream Home Finder form and I'll conduct a personalized search for you.

If you're planning to sell your home in the next few months, nothing is more important than knowing a fair asking price. I would love to help you with a FREE Market Analysis. I will use comparable sold listings to help you determine the accurate market value of your home.  

Whether the circumstance is marriage, a new job, a growing family or retirement, most people move as a result of a major life change.  This is a potentially stressful and exhilarating time for a buyer or seller.  Buyers and sellers need a trusted friend in the real estate process, “Because Life Changes.”  I am responsible for guiding them through the details of the technical and, at times, emotional side of their real estate transaction, give them all the facts, then let them make the decision that works best for their lifestyle.  Ultimately, they ask me to help them manage this major change for them—to be their “Agent of Change.”   With 30 years experience, I am ready to help!  Contact Dot Rhone today!

 

Testimonials Page

My wife and I were real estate novices before buying our first home. After 20 minutes with Dot we knew everything we needed to know! She was professional, helpful, patient, and an excellent advocate when the seller was not acting in our interest. At every stop along the way to homeownership Dot thoroughly explained our options, and every referral she offered us, from mortgage broker to inspection company, was as professional and thorough as she was. We are truly grateful that we had Dot on our team! Mike and Eleanor Vogt
While Dot was handling my home purchase here in Columbia County my mom was selling her home in Snyder County with another agent from a different realty company. I was in the unique position to compare my experience with Dot to that of my mom's with another agent. My mom's experience was a nightmare for her. I came very quickly to appreciate Dot's consummate professionalism, strong sense of values and ethical conduct, knowledge and expertise, and genuine care for me as a client. I will never live to see the day when I can thank Dot enough for helping me sail through the purchase of my first home with ease and peace of mind. She is the best, in my opinion! Matthew Swinehart
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Real Estate News!!!

Latest Realty News from NAR

Why You Really Don’t Have Enough Time

You may have decided to get into real estate so you could be your own boss, set up your own working hours and make a lot of money.

So, how’s that working for you?

The challenge with entrepreneurship is being laser-focused on dollar-productive activities. When you first get into the business, you need to learn the skills, implement systems, install new programs, deploy various platforms, study scripts, market and process transactions. That’s a full-time job, and you haven’t even begun to work with buyers and sellers.

But here’s where most agents fail: They get too busy working in the business and fail to work on their business.

By nature, our business is radically unpredictable. Buyers decide to buy, and sellers decide to sell on their own timetable—and we want to be there at that magic moment—but the intensity of showing buyers, servicing sellers and maintaining prospecting can be daunting unless you develop a plan to keep all the plates spinning and the income funnel full.

The plan is simple—but getting an agent to do it is the hard part.

No matter what’s happening, only you have the power to block your day. This begins with blocking out dollar-productive activities by using a My Perfect Week Planner.*

The system visually helps you lay out a perfect week so that you’re able to establish a rhythm of daily habits that result in regular, consistent income. Think of blocking your time using a traffic light as an example:

  • Red is for non-negotiable time. These hours are reserved for your personal “big rocks” like sleep, family time, etc.
  • Yellow is used to time-block a daily prospecting hour. I can imagine you rolling your eyes right about now, but prospecting is the key to getting paid regularly. Pretend that this is sacred time, even if it’s 15-30-minute increments five days a week, and stick to it. Whether you’re prospect-phobic or simply believe prospecting is limited to cold calls, think conversation, not solicitation. Rotate through your sphere of influence with scheduled calls to update contact information and to share a save-the-date for your future client appreciation party. These approaches are easy and friendly.
  • Green is the easiest time to block on your weekly calendar. These are appointments that are related to earning or receiving money, and are usually the most fun. Block in green the hours you’ve earmarked for closings, listing appointments or working with buyers.

The goal is to increase the green in your weekly calendar. You wouldn’t want to miss a closing, so why not block out a small increment of time to talk to more people in order to make more sales so you have more green in your week?

Sit down at the beginning of each week to plan. Real estate has plenty of opportunity for busy work that will rob you of energy and income, so take control of your week before the chaos hits so that you can do those activities that serve and pay you first. It’s also a good idea to get a good coach to help you learn new habits to plan for success, and hire out the administrative work so that you can focus on being the CEO, building your business every day, one day at a time.

*For a complimentary copy of My Perfect/Productive Week Scheduler, visit http://bit.ly/2raO1Dj

Murphy_Terri_2018_60x60Terri Murphy is a communication engagement specialist, author, speaker and coach. She is the author/co-author of five books, and founder of MurphyOnRealEstate.com. Contact her at TerriMurphy.com or Terri@TerriMurphy.com.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Why You Really Don’t Have Enough Time appeared first on RISMedia.

Bring Calm to the Chaos in Your Business

As the selling season continues to pick up, many agents find themselves busy and struggling to fit everything into their days. Although they’re grateful for the business, they worry that other important people and tasks are falling through the cracks. As a result, they may work long days in an effort to squeeze it all in and boost productivity, only to find themselves tired, frustrated and less productive. Here are some best practices for bringing calm to the chaos in your business…

  1. Prioritize
    When you have your priorities in place, you know where to spend your time. What are your priorities? On the business side, it could be to expand your database 25 percent or to surpass last year’s sales figures.

On the personal side, your priorities may be your children’s sports games or plays, a weekly lunch date with your spouse, a weekly morning meeting with a community group, or volunteering with a favorite organization. Your priorities are the things you don’t want to miss, no matter what. Pencil these in to your schedule before anything else.

  1. Organize
    Once your priorities are set, you can then organize everything else. Breaking the process into these four segments will allow you to regularly review your schedule so that you’re focusing on the things that are most important to you instead of becoming bogged down by less important tasks. This will help you become more productive, serve your clients better and honor your priorities.
  • Your year: Throughout the year, take out your calendar and pencil in your priorities—a family vacation, a long weekend, your children’s activities, industry workshops, client parties and other important days. Although nothing needs to be set in stone, including these things in your calendar will help you plan the rest of your year and ensure they don’t get overlooked.
  • Your month: Each month, review the priorities you’ve already accounted for on your annual calendar and add in other important activities that have come up since, such as workshops and seminars, holidays perfect for getting social with clients, etc.
  • Your week: At the beginning of the week, review what you have scheduled and include any important meetings, client lunches, etc.
  • Your day: In addition to making time for lead generation and your personal and business priorities, fill in the rest of your day accordingly. If you find yourself putting out a lot of fires, make time at the end of the day to handle all the unexpected challenges that arose during the day.
  1. Systemize
    A system will help you commit to both your priorities and your newly organized schedule. It provides a framework to follow so that you never have to wonder what you need to do each day to optimize your business. Over time, you’ll build the successful habits that are sure to cause your business to thrive. Remember to rely on a good CRM to help ensure you stick to the system and track your progress toward your goals.

Along the way, a coach is a valuable person to have in your corner as you try to calm the chaos. A good coach will provide an objective perspective on your business each step of the way; from helping you define your priorities to helping you organize your week. Additionally, they can help you pinpoint the aspects of your system that may prove the most beneficial to your business and help you achieve your goals within your desired timeframe. In short, a coach will help you reach your potential, optimize your productivity and build a thriving, successful business.

For more information, visit buffiniandcompany.com.

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How to Plan Your Next Trip Around a ‘Walkcation’

(TNS)—On my latest trip to Chicago, I consumed nine tacos, three doughnuts, an Indian crepe, a giant tamale, a mound of carnitas, a bowl of pasta and a table full of Vietnamese food. How did I not gain 15 pounds? Well, I also walked eight to 10 miles per day, which is typical for me when I travel.

Exploring a city on foot has so many benefits. I stumble on unique gems that I likely wouldn’t find otherwise. I hear neighbors talk to each other. I suddenly feel like a local, which, in my opinion, is the best thing to feel when you visit a place. As a bonus, you can eat more.

Here are a few tips for planning your next “walkcation”:

Pick your highlights and pin them. First, figure out what you most want to do or see, and then plot your findings. The Google Maps app allows users to custom-label any address or landmark with names and little flags that pop up when you look at the map as a whole. This way, you’ll easily see which of your favorites are within walking distance of each other.

Think neighborhoods. Consider using your highlights as jumping-off points for neighborhood crawls. Research the borders of a neighborhood, map out the main streets and hit the pavement. Walking is the best way to get a sense of an area’s character and what it has to offer. Stop at anything you find interesting.

Do the distance. Checking out a park? Walk its circumference before leaving. A museum? Take the stairs between levels. Want to lounge on the beach? Walk a mile on it first.

Track your progress. Pedometer apps are easy to find by searching the phrase in your smartphone’s app store. Watching the miles tick upward is motivating.

Dress in a versatile style. With all this walking, you’ll need the same outfit to span breakfast, lunch and dinner—and don’t forget to wear a good pair of walking shoes.

©2018 Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
Visit the Star Tribune (Minneapolis) at www.startribune.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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Real Estate Q&A: How Can I Make My Community’s Board Listen to My Ideas?

(TNS)—Q: I live in a beautiful community that is well maintained by the board and its various committees. All is great, except for the roads—they are ugly with oil marks and patched areas. I have asked after this, but it does not seem to be a priority of the board of directors. How do I get the board to address this issue? – Philip

A: Most people who want to get their board’s attention try to bring up a new issue at the public board meeting. This is not a good idea and will most likely not work.

A board meeting is a business meeting and should be run from an agenda of items known to all in advance so that the members and directors have ample time to research and consider the issues to be dealt with during that meeting. The common tactic of trying to embarrass or ambush the board at the meeting almost always backfires. Simply, the board meeting is not the time to introduce a new issue.

The better method is to send your board a letter outlining your concern. Try to be detailed and propose solutions. Explain why you think it is an essential use of the community’s resources, bearing in mind that other residents may have differing priorities. Send the letter by certified mail to ensure it gets the attention it deserves.

If it still does not make the agenda, try again, or, even better, get some neighbors to write in, too. Many voices will hold more sway than just one.

Finally, if, after all of these efforts, the existing board does not share your priorities for the community, you should consider running for the board at the next election. When you are a board member, you are able to help set the agenda and get your ideas pushed through—at least, that is, if enough of your neighbors agree with you.

Gary M. Singer is a Florida attorney and board-certified as an expert in real estate law by the Florida Bar.

©2018 Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)
Visit Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) at
www.sun-sentinel.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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The post Real Estate Q&A: How Can I Make My Community’s Board Listen to My Ideas? appeared first on RISMedia.

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