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Dorothy B. "Dot" Rhone
Broker/Owner
Century 21 Covered Bridges Realty, Inc.

ABR, CRS, CRB, GRI, e-PRO, SRS, SFR, One America
Office:  570-784-2821 x 19
Cell and Text: 570-204-0279
Email: Dot@DotRhone.com
Licensed in PA # RM421649

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Welcome

Welcome to the premier resource for all real estate information and services in the area!  I am Dorothy B. "Dot" Rhone, Broker/Owner of Century 21 Covered Bridges Realty, Inc. in Bloomsburg, PA.  I hope you enjoy your visit and explore everything my website has to offer!  Here you will find everything you need to know when buying or selling a property in Columbia, Montour, or lower Luzerne county in Pennsylvania in one place!  To get familiar with our local real estate values, here you can view all the current homes on the market in our multiple listing service, as well as see properties that have recently sold. 

Looking for a new home? Use Quick Search or Map Search to browse an up-to-date database list of all available properties in the area, or use my Dream Home Finder form and I'll conduct a personalized search for you.

If you're planning to sell your home in the next few months, nothing is more important than knowing a fair asking price. I would love to help you with a FREE Market Analysis. I will use comparable sold listings to help you determine the accurate market value of your home.  

Whether the circumstance is marriage, a new job, a growing family or retirement, most people move as a result of a major life change.  This is a potentially stressful and exhilarating time for a buyer or seller.  Buyers and sellers need a trusted friend in the real estate process, “Because Life Changes.”  I am responsible for guiding them through the details of the technical and, at times, emotional side of their real estate transaction, give them all the facts, then let them make the decision that works best for their lifestyle.  Ultimately, they ask me to help them manage this major change for them—to be their “Agent of Change.”   With 30 years experience, I am ready to help!  Contact Dot Rhone today!

 

Testimonials Page

My wife and I were real estate novices before buying our first home. After 20 minutes with Dot we knew everything we needed to know! She was professional, helpful, patient, and an excellent advocate when the seller was not acting in our interest. At every stop along the way to homeownership Dot thoroughly explained our options, and every referral she offered us, from mortgage broker to inspection company, was as professional and thorough as she was. We are truly grateful that we had Dot on our team! Mike and Eleanor Vogt
While Dot was handling my home purchase here in Columbia County my mom was selling her home in Snyder County with another agent from a different realty company. I was in the unique position to compare my experience with Dot to that of my mom's with another agent. My mom's experience was a nightmare for her. I came very quickly to appreciate Dot's consummate professionalism, strong sense of values and ethical conduct, knowledge and expertise, and genuine care for me as a client. I will never live to see the day when I can thank Dot enough for helping me sail through the purchase of my first home with ease and peace of mind. She is the best, in my opinion! Matthew Swinehart
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Real Estate News!!!

Latest Realty News from NAR

How to Avoid Problems With Your Spring Renovations and Repairs

As soon as winter weather starts giving way to fairer days, folks start itching to get any planned repairs, maintenance and renovations started.

If you want to protect yourself from rogue and incompetent builders, take some advice from the Connecticut Better Business Bureau’s Howard Schwartz, who suggests a few time-honored procedures.

Schwartz says it is essential to obtain multiple estimates before signing a contract. Study these estimates to learn what type of work is needed, the quality of materials they plan to use, how long the job may take, and its total cost.

Schwartz says details may vary, but if one estimate is substantially lower than the others, ask why. Here are a few more tips:

Check bbb.org to learn how long a contractor has been in business, contact information, verified customer reviews, complaint details, and how the business responded.

Don’t be lured into signing a contract if someone offers a “today only” special. That is a sales tactic designed to get you to sign a contract or put down a deposit without giving you an opportunity to do your research.

Obtain references from recent customers. You may want to speak with other property owners who had work done recently.

Get everything in writing. All verbal promises should be contained in the contract, as well as a detailed description of the type of work needed, the quality of materials, how long the job may take, specifics about the deposit and payment schedule, and guarantees for the quality of work and materials.

Pulling permits. Contractors should obtain necessary permits as part of the job. If they’d rather not go for permits, it might be a warning sign.

Compare apples to apples. Choosing a prospective contractor is simpler if you ask for quotes based on the number of hours needed and the same quality of materials.

Finally, avoid putting down a large deposit. Schwartz says a typical schedule follows the “Rule of Thirds.” The first payment is made when signing the contract, the second when work begins, and the final payment when the job is finished and you are satisfied with the quality of work.

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The post How to Avoid Problems With Your Spring Renovations and Repairs appeared first on RISMedia.

Real Estate Q&A: Can I Get My Neighbor to Pay for Her Tree’s Damage to My House?

(TNS)—Q: My neighbor’s large, seemingly dead tree overhangs my screened-in pool and has long made me nervous. I have repeatedly asked her to remove it. She always ignored or rejected my requests. During a hurricane, the tree finally came down, like I knew it would, and damaged my pool cage and house. The damage, while expensive, was less than my insurance deductible. Can I get my neighbor to pay for the damage?

A: The rules regarding neighbors’ trees that overhang or intrude on your property are long settled and have been discussed in this space before: If a branch or root extends on your property, you may trim the tree back to the property line but may not kill or unnecessarily damage the tree. If you do not take the opportunity to do this, and your property is damaged as a result, you would bear the repair costs.

The concept is, simply stated, that it is better to let you protect your own property in a reasonable way, then subject your neighbors to the burden—and the public to the numerous lawsuits that would ensue if the rule were any different.

However, your situation was not typical since the tree may have been dead and you had repeatedly warned your neighbor of the problem it could cause. In determining whether you can seek reimbursement from your neighbor, the health of the fallen tree should be considered. If the tree was dead, and your neighbor knew it could cause a problem, she can be held responsible for the repairs in court.

Generally speaking, when a neighbor’s living tree falls on your house, you need to make your own repairs—but if the tree is dead, then your neighbor is on the hook.

Gary M. Singer is a Florida attorney and board-certified as an expert in real estate law by the Florida Bar.

©2018 Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)
Visit Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) at
www.sun-sentinel.com
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Planning Your Spring ‘To Do’ List? Don’t Forget to Go Outside!

I know it’s warm and cozy doing your spring cleaning inside, but remember that spring cleaning plans should include a thorough walk around outside, as well.

The Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC (MMA) in Minneapolis tells homeowners that an early inspection and maintenance of their property is extremely important to prevent risk. To assist in that, MMA has compiled a checklist of things to inspect each year:

Review the roof. The company suggests starting by inspecting your roof for broken or missing shingles and interior rafters for water stains. Most water stains will be found around or below an inadequately flashed chimney, skylight and other openings.

Gut the gutters. MMA says gutters are able to perform when kept clean, so remove dirt and debris from all gutters and downspouts.

Look at lights. Lighting maintenance includes inspecting street lights, outdoor light fixtures, and indoor common-area lighting to promote safety and security. Make sure lights are clean and void of any dust, dirt or salt, which can result in lost energy and money. If lights are burnt out, think about replacing them with high efficiency CFL or LED bulbs.

Don’t miss the deck. When inspecting a deck or porch, look for peeling, splintering or rotting boards, and whether the wood is unprotected. If left unprotected, wood will soak up moisture and could lead to very serious damage. If a deck or porch needs to be resealed, clean it first with soap and water to clear off any mildew or mold, then after it is clean and dry, apply sealant, stain or paint.

Take care of trees. Remove dead wood and broken branches from trees or bushes. Replant shrubs, bushes and/or flowers that have worked their way out of the soil, and rake the ground.

Freshen with fertilizer. If necessary, add new soil, mulch and/or sod and lay fertilizer. Then, plant any new seeds or plants and implement a watering schedule.

Patch potholes. Finally, MMA says spring is a great time to repair cracks and potholes. First, determine the source of the issue so you can address and fix the root of the problem. It is always best to make these repairs as quickly as possible to prevent any type of hazardous conditions.

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The post Planning Your Spring ‘To Do’ List? Don’t Forget to Go Outside! appeared first on RISMedia.

How to Catch the Lowest Possible Airfares

(TNS)—Let’s get one thing clear from the start. Airfares are volatile. While it’s true that flying on a Tuesday or Wednesday is cheaper than on a Friday or Sunday, there is no magic time of day, day of week or month of year to book a low airfare. Airfares can change in a heartbeat, high one minute and low the next, and the trick is to buy when a fare on your route becomes a bargain.

Fare Drop Alerts
First, sign up for airfare price drop alerts. Many websites now offer these at no charge, sending out lists of unusually cheap fares (some of them “fat finger” mistake fares), that while valid for travel over several months, usually expire quickly. Take a look at theflightdeal.com, hitlistapp.com, secretflying.com, exitfares.com and Fly4free.com. They often have the same deals, but I suggest signing up for all of them and to follow them on Twitter if you use it. Other sites, such as Kayak.com, Yapta.com and GoogleFlights.com, will track fares on specific flights and dates and alert you to price drops. When you see a great deal, buy it (you can always change your mind and cancel within 24 hours, per U.S. DOT regulations).

Here’s What I Use
My go-to sites when I arrange personal travel are Kayak.com (I love using its flexible month and flexible weekend options) and two Google offerings: Google.com/flights/explore and Google.com/flights. The “explore” site allows you to choose a trip length, departure city and an arrival city or region (such as “United States,” “Europe” or “Boston”) and then displays a selection of the lowest fares available over the next few months. It’s perfect for anyone with flexible travel dates and destinations. The “flights” site asks you to choose origin city and destination along with specific travel dates so it’s more geared to those with less flexibility; however, none of these sites include Southwest Airlines, so you also need to compare at Southwest.com. If you’re date-flexible, use Southwest’s low-fare calendar option.

Don’t Forget Online Travel Agencies (OTAs)
It may be cheaper to fly out on one airline and back on another using one-way fares, and OTAs such as Expedia and Priceline are a good place to find out. They also sell air plus hotel packages that usually cost less than buying separately and they sometimes have fares that are much lower than the same flights and dates sold directly by the airline sites (I recently saw fares on Priceline to South Africa on Dutch airline KLM that were hundreds less than if bought on KLM.com and fares on Delta to Italy that were much cheaper on Expedia than on Delta.com).

Make Sure the Site Covers Delta
Speaking of Delta, that airline restricts where its airfare data appear on some popular third-party sites such as Hopper, Hipmunk, TripAdvisor and FareCompare.com, so beware. JetBlue recently removed its fare data from several “meta search” sites as well.

Choose ‘Basic Economy’ Fares With Care
Copying ultra-low-cost airlines such as Spirit and Frontier, now Delta, American and United also sell bare-bones economy class fares. On domestic routes, they typically cost $40-$60 (round trip) less than regular economy, although the savings can be greater to international destinations. Buy one of these fares and, except on Delta, you’ll pay even for a carry-on bag, unless it’s small enough to fit under the seat in front of you; you won’t be able to choose a specific seat before check-in (which means you’ll end up in a dreaded middle seat); and your fare will be entirely non-refundable and non-changeable. Although I’d never buy one of these airfares, my millennial friends, who apparently travel with just a change of clothes and a toothbrush stuffed into a backpack that slides under the seat, tell me that they’re worth the inconvenience.

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